Feb/14
Vladimir Kulic

Learning from Yugoslavia

The exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980 ended its six-month run at the Museum of Modern Art on January 15. What is there to learn from it in 2019? Is there any kind of operative knowledge to be gleaned from the exhibited material beyond the historiographic “discovery” of a hitherto unknown region? The talk will focus on a few Yugoslav case-studies to argue in favor of the former socialist world as a repository of neglected architectural knowledge that could be valuable in today’s practice.

Vladimir Kulic

Iowa State University

Vladimir Kulić is an architectural historian, curator, and critic, and Associate Professor at the College of Design, Iowa State University. He is the co-curator of the exhibition Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948-1980 at the Museum of Modern Art in New York (July 2018-January 2019), and author and editor of several books, including Modernism In-Between: The Mediatory Architectures of Socialist Yugoslavia (2012) and Second World Postmodernisms: Architecture and Society Under Late Socialism (2019). Vladimir has received numerous fellowships and grants, including those from the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton (2017), Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. (2015), American Academy in Berlin (2015), and Graham Foundation (2007, 2014, 2018).