HTC Forum

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The HTC Forum is the main lecture series of the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art Program. It is organized by graduate students and made possible by the Lipstadt-Stieber Fund. Other talks organized by faculty may also be listed among the Forum lectures. All of them are open to the public and free.

Directions to the Long Lounge (7-429): From 77 Massachusetts Avenue, go up the steps and enter, you are in building 7. Take the elevator that is in the back left-hand corner to the fourth floor and exit to the left (alternatively take the stairs located near the elevator behind a set of double doors, exit to the right). Go straight and The Long Lounge is on your left-hand side. The general location can be seen on the campus map. However, it will not show a specific room location.

Feb 15, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

How could an elitist institution acquire a virtually unique standing around the world? Because it reconciles the conflicting experiences of immersion and engagement in a place of sustained silence while the world has become too lonely for the individual and too loud for our ears. After yesterday’s Museums, today’s Concert Halls extend the quest for a collective experience of intelligence at play. The challenge of designing Concert Halls as urban landmarks has solicited some of the most imaginative architectural ideas.

Feb 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
room 7-429/Long Lounge

Few of us can ignore contemporary discourses on truth and falsity. How are we to verify information about some of the most pressing issues of the day? With this presentation, I open up discussion about a subject in art—the “incredulity” of St. Thomas—that thematized such matters in pre-modern Europe. Focusing on late medieval and Renaissance paintings and sculptures, I explore the ways in which visual artists pointed to the tactile as a way of enhancing the truth-value of their works.

Mar 1, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

In recent years, an increasing interest in systems, processes, and performance has challenged the status of the architectural object, dissolving distinctions between figure and ground, object and field.  This talk investigates an earlier moment of challenge by exploring connections between weather and architecture in eighteenth-century England.