May/07
Jonathan Crary

Jonathan Crary

On Biometrics and the Constriction of Experience

Over the past decade the scope of biometric monitoring has expanded exponentially. Scanning capabilities, including those for eye tracking, face and voice recognition and emotion detection, are being embedded in an increasingly broad range of devices, locations and applications. Critical engagement with biometrics has overwhelmingly addressed the important issues of surveillance, privacy and data mining. This paper will, instead, reflect on some of the perceptual, ethical and experiential consequences of biometric technologies, with eye tracking as a particular concern.

Jonathan Crary

Jonathan Crary is the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Modern Art and Theory at Columbia University, where he has taught since 1989. He has written widely on art, film and modern visual culture and his articles have been published in ARTFORUM, ART IN AMERICA, DOMUS, GREY ROOM, OCTOBER, FILM COMMENT, CAHIERS DU CINEMA and other periodicals, and he written critical essays for over thirty exhibition catalogues. His books include TECHNIQUES OF THE OBSERVER, SUSPENSIONS OF PERCEPTION, INCORPORATIONS and most recently 24/7. He was a founder of Zone Books in 1987 and is currently a coeditor of this widely noted press. He has been the recipient of Guggenheim, Mellon, Getty and National Endowment for the Arts fellowships and has been a member of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.