Lectures + Events

See all lectures (archive)

Fall 2019

Lectures are free and open to the public. For some lectures, members of the MIT community with IDs will be admitted 30 minutes prior to the lecture and the general public will be admitted as space permits.

Except as noted, lectures are at 6:00 pm in Room 7-429, located at 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA.  An interactive map may be found on-line at: http://whereis.mit.edu/map-jpg

Sep 12, 2019 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
6:00 PM, Room 7-429/Long Lounge
Organized by Assistant Professor Brandon Clifford

Where the Worldviews Are

Sep 13, 2019 - 12:00pm
Long Lounge 7-429

In the early 1960s top Israeli archaeologists were taken on a state-sponsored mission of rescuing ancient scrolls, supposedly hidden in the Judean Desert caves from looting. One team of archaeologists managed climbing three extremely hard-to-access caves hanging over the cliffs of Nahal Mishmar (Mishmar canyon). In these caves they were amazed to discover unique archaeological treasures, as well as skeletons of 21 children, women and men. A forensic investigation discovered that those individuals died from severe violence, hundreds to thousands of years ago. Who were these people?

Sep 16, 2019 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
6:00 PM, Room 7-429/Long Lounge
Organized by the Critical Broadcasting Lab

Conversations on Care
Critical Broadcasting Lab

Sep 24, 2019 - 6:00pm
7-429 Long Lounge

This paper is an exploration into sound and music as historical materials. Although it delves momentarily into the parallel and intersecting histories of modern aurality and visual culture, this paper considers different aspects of music composition and performance—sampling, coding, recording, and live instrumentation—as techniques for creating historical knowledge. To demonstrate, this paper will consider a work-in-progress—a musical composition whereby Josef Albers paintings and Anni Albers textile become sonic landscapes.

Sep 25, 2019 - 5:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

*Please note that this lecture has been postponed due to the earthquake in Adriatic Sea on September 21. We will work with the Mayor's office to reschedule the lecture for another time.

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
5:00 PM, Room 7-429/Long Lounge
Organized by Associate Professor Rafi Segal

Redesigning for the People: Tirana Transformed

Sep 26, 2019 - 6:00pm
7-429/Long Lounge

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
Ahmad Tehrani Symposium
Iwan Baan and Michael Maltzan, in conversation
6:00 PM, Room 7-429/Long Lounge

*note this is the postponed event from the Spring 2019 Lecture Series

Sep 27, 2019 - 10:00am
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

Our society can seem like one of constant publicity and self-promotion. We Tweet; we post on Instagram and Facebook; we consume the feeds of ArchDaily and Archinect; we share projects that are fictional; and we share projects live as they develop. It can feel like everything is out there to see. Everything is public.

Oct 3, 2019 - 6:00pm
10-250

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
The 25th Pietro Belluschi Lecture
6:00 PM, Room 10-250   

 

Oct 18, 2019 - 10:00am
7-429/Long Lounge

“Why should I hire an amateur when I can hire a professional?”

“Why does this RFP say that I need to have done five libraries already?”

“I care about big ideas, but I care more that an architect can deliver on them.”

Architects are hired for the unique and innovative thinking they bring to a project. We are also hired to design that project on time and on budget. How does the balance between “fresh ideas” and the authority that comes from experience play out in the realm of architectural practice?

Oct 21, 2019 - 12:30pm
Long Lounge, Room 7-429

Building Technology Group / Lecture

Long Lounge/Room 7-429 12:30 PM

Matthew Herman will be talking about recent work around the globe.  This work will span from City Wide Climate Actions Plans to bespoke tool development.  His lecture will cover current industry tends relating the growth of cities in the error of climate change, new building design, existing building assets, infrastructure, and decision making tools to help inform the deployment of capital and resources.  Please be ready to contribute to an active discussion.  

Oct 22, 2019 - 6:00pm
Long Lounge 7-429

This paper discusses how the alkali industry transformed two towns in northwestern England and considers some of the complexities of environmental systems and stories that are still embedded in the landscape – long after many of the physical traces of the Victorian chemical industry have long since disappeared.  

Oct 24, 2019 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
6:00 PM, Room 7-429/Long Lounge
Organized by the Critical Broadcasting Lab

Conversations on Care
Critical Broadcasting Lab

Oct 25, 2019 - 5:30pm
Keller Gallery, Room 7-408

October 25, 5:30 PM
Keller Gallery, Room 7-408
Opening Reception

Oct 28, 2019 - 2:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

Carl D'Apolito-Dworkin and Yushiro Okamoto

Carl D'Apolito-Dworkin and Yushiro Okamoto

MIT Department of Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series

Practice in Rationalization : Discretization in Practice 
Case Studies from DS+R and Preston Scott Cohen Architects

Nov 5, 2019 - 6:00pm
Long Lounge, Room 7-429

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
Edward and Mary Allen Lecture in Structural Design

November 5, 2019
6 PM, Long Lounge/Room 7-429

Nov 14, 2019 - 6:00pm
Long Lounge, Room 7-429

MIT Architecture | Fall 2019 Lecture Series
6:00 PM
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

Nov 19, 2019 - 6:00pm
Long Lounge 7-429

Does science need to be useful? Are productivity and innovation good goals for academics? Do academics need to be paid? For what would you pay them and how much? And what would happen if you did not pay them? Does anyone need to go to school? Can’t you make do with apprenticeship and perhaps a few private lessons? Seventeenth-century Istanbul may hold some possible answers. For roughly a century, Istanbul produced no texts dealing with the classical sciences of astronomy, theoretical medicine and natural philosophy as hyperinflation wrecked living conditions of the professoriate.