Journal Article
Parallel Multiple-Bounce Irradiance Caching

Building designers rely on predictive rendering techniques to design naturally and artificially lit environments. However, despite decades of work on the correctness of global illumination rendering techniques, our ability to accurately predict light levels in buildings—and to do so in a short time frame as part of an iterative design process—remains limited. In this paper, we present a novel approach to parallelizing construction of an irradiance cache over multiple-bounce paths. Relevant points for irradiance calculation based on one or multiple cameras are located by tracing rays through multiple-bounce paths. Irradiance values are then saved to a cache in reverse bounce order so that the irradiance calculation at each bounce samples from previously calculated values. We show by comparison to high-dynamic range photography of a moderately complex space that our method can predict luminance distribution as accurately as Radiance, the most widely validated tool used today for architectural predictive rendering of daylit spaces, and that it is faster by an order of magnitude.

Title
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsJones N, Reinhart C
JournalComputer Graphics Forum
Volume35
Issue4
Start Page57
Pagination57-66
Date Published07/2016
KeywordsComputer graphics, Daylighting, Glare, Parallel computing, Simulation, Visual discomfort
Abstract

Building designers rely on predictive rendering techniques to design naturally and artificially lit environments. However, despite decades of work on the correctness of global illumination rendering techniques, our ability to accurately predict light levels in buildings—and to do so in a short time frame as part of an iterative design process—remains limited. In this paper, we present a novel approach to parallelizing construction of an irradiance cache over multiple-bounce paths. Relevant points for irradiance calculation based on one or multiple cameras are located by tracing rays through multiple-bounce paths. Irradiance values are then saved to a cache in reverse bounce order so that the irradiance calculation at each bounce samples from previously calculated values. We show by comparison to high-dynamic range photography of a moderately complex space that our method can predict luminance distribution as accurately as Radiance, the most widely validated tool used today for architectural predictive rendering of daylit spaces, and that it is faster by an order of magnitude.

URLhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/cgf.12949/full
DOI10.1111/cgf.12949
Refereed DesignationRefereed