4.A06
Freshman Advising Seminar — Design is Everywhere

Open only to: 
Freshmen

In the past, creative careers were often discouraged, considered risky and certainly not lucrative. Tomorrow’s economy will require greater creativity in many areas beyond the visual and performing arts, music & literature. The traditionally ‘left-brained’, ‘conservative’ and ‘safe’ engineer, technologist and/or scientist will require a very different toolkit to survive, and thrive.

Today’s designers are able to move across domains and industries, identify convergences, and create impact. Design thinkers are not generalists, but specialists of a different sort. They take a unified approach to solving problems by combining design thinking with skills from engineering, science, the humanities and management.

This seminar will explore design’s presence and role in a variety of disciplines. We will take field trips to local companies to see and better understand the role of design in industries traditionally thought of as engineering, science or service. Simultaneously, we will have lectures & conversations with MIT faculty, from a variety of majors, discussing the role of design in their academic discipline and industry. You will choose one MIT Course/Major to investigate for the role of design. Your investigation will be shared with your classmates. By sharing our investigations & discoveries, we will explore together and learn from each other. 

What is a Freshman Advising Seminar?

The Freshman Advising Seminars (FAS) program, offered by the Office of Undergraduate Advising and Academic Programming, is one advising option available to freshmen. It is available only to first-term freshmen, who must apply online. A Freshman Advising Seminar is typically led by a faculty member who also serves as the freshman advisor to the small group of seminar advisees. While FASes vary in style and topic, most are oriented to group discussion and offer an opportunity to interact closely with faculty.

All Advising Seminars receive six units of credit and are graded P/D/F.