HTC Forum

See all department lectures

The HTC Forum is the main lecture series of the History, Theory, and Criticism of Architecture and Art Program. It is organized by graduate students and made possible by the Lipstadt-Stieber Fund. Other talks organized by faculty may also be listed among the Forum lectures. All of them are open to the public and free.

Directions to the Long Lounge (7-429): From 77 Massachusetts Avenue, go up the steps and enter, you are in building 7. Take the elevator that is in the back left-hand corner to the fourth floor and exit to the left (alternatively take the stairs located near the elevator behind a set of double doors, exit to the right). Go straight and The Long Lounge is on your left-hand side. The general location can be seen on the campus map. However, it will not show a specific room location.

Dec 4, 2018 - 6:00pm
7-429

In late 1862, a curator from London’s Patent Museum named Francis Pettit Smith traveled to Birmingham on a collecting mission. Seeking to acquire a prototype of James Watt’s steam engine from the Soho manufactory established by Matthew Boulton in the mid-1760s, Smith unearthed an unusual set of chemo-mechanical images. With these images, Smith made a daring intervention as much into the imagining of Enlightenment industrial history as to consolidating narratives of photography’s origins.

Feb 12, 2019 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

 

Sophie Hochhäusl (Architectural History and Theory, University of Pennsylvania) with a commentary by Raphael Koenig (Comparative Literature, Harvard University) and Christianna Bonin (History, Theory and Criticism of Architecture + Art, MIT) 

Mar 19, 2019 - 6:00pm
7-429/Long Lounge

Responding to Michel Foucault's thesis that sometime between the mid-18th and 19th centuries "population" came to displace "territory" as the primary object of governance, this talk proposes that perhaps no displacement was necessary, given that the governance of population became a primary vehicle for territorial conquest and management, especially through the device of settler colonialism.