Public Lecture Series

Feb 15, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

How could an elitist institution acquire a virtually unique standing around the world? Because it reconciles the conflicting experiences of immersion and engagement in a place of sustained silence while the world has become too lonely for the individual and too loud for our ears. After yesterday’s Museums, today’s Concert Halls extend the quest for a collective experience of intelligence at play. The challenge of designing Concert Halls as urban landmarks has solicited some of the most imaginative architectural ideas.

Feb 20, 2018 - 6:00pm
room 7-429/Long Lounge

Few of us can ignore contemporary discourses on truth and falsity. How are we to verify information about some of the most pressing issues of the day? With this presentation, I open up discussion about a subject in art—the “incredulity” of St. Thomas—that thematized such matters in pre-modern Europe. Focusing on late medieval and Renaissance paintings and sculptures, I explore the ways in which visual artists pointed to the tactile as a way of enhancing the truth-value of their works.

Feb 26, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 3-133

What do we see, when we see a refugee camp? States providing asylum are often unwilling to integrate refugees into the economy or social structure, and maintain them in remote camps in undeveloped areas, served by parallel systems or foreign aid. Refugees in camps inhabit edge conditions, surviving between competing entities and interests. The casual images of precarity that ensue form the dominant visual archive.

Mar 1, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 7-429/Long Lounge

In recent years, an increasing interest in systems, processes, and performance has challenged the status of the architectural object, dissolving distinctions between figure and ground, object and field.  This talk investigates an earlier moment of challenge by exploring connections between weather and architecture in eighteenth-century England.

Mar 12, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 3-133

Ariella Azoulay is Professor of Modern Culture and Media and the Department of Comparative Literature at Brown University.

Apr 23, 2018 - 6:00pm
Room 3-133

War-torn countries have in common the brutal nature of the destruction, affecting simultaneously several cities, over large areas. However, throughout history, the rebuilding of war-devastated cities has taken place in very different forms. In this context and among the wars that the central Maghreb (present-day Algeria) has sustained was the resistance war to the French occupation; an armed conflict that opposed the resistance leader Emir Abd al-Qadir and the French colonial army, from 1832 to 1847.