Oct/15
A. Mridul and Shilpa Mridul - Cancelled

Contemporizing Traditional Water Architecture: Regeneration | Mainstreaming | Replication

Lecture cancelled -- to be rescheduled in Spring 2019.

A. Mridul and Shilpa Mridul - Cancelled

A.Mridul
A. Mridul, an internationally awarded architect, has a variegated palette of projects in India and the US. He is passionate about the ancient water heritage of India and has been campaigning for its regeneration & mainstreaming and replication, the latter exemplified by his internationally acclaimed project, Birkha Bawari, a massive rain-water harvesting step-well built in 2009. He has been delivering a series of talks at various forums in India, Australia and the UK. Mridul’s practice is an interesting mix of various types: institutional, public, housing, religious, etc. His projects are an extension of heritage and contemporize traditional practices to make them timeless, thus modern and futuristic.
An exponent of Green Architecture, it was for him a praxis much before it became a movement. He holds that India already has a rich repertoire of traditional construction and design practices that can be innovated upon and applied to contemporary designs to achieve eco-friendly sustainable architectural creations that do not guzzle on energy. His portrait as Leader of Sustainability has been compiled by mid-career professional pursuing the Executive Master of Natural Resources program of the Virginia Tech University, USA. He sits on juries and boards of public and private institutions and is currently officiating as Chairman of Rupayan Sansthan, a folk lore institute founded by noted anthropologist Komal Kothari. Together with his wife, he has co-founded The Jodhpur Lore, an initiative to promote centuries old traditional crafts of the region through workshops and training.

Shilpa Mridul
Mrs. Shilpa Mridul is an entrepreneur, a garment designer, an interior designer, a theatre artist and, at the same time, an ambassador of green architecture. She has worked in reviving traditional and vernacular designs by deftly weaving ethnicity in modern clothes. Through this, she has enlisted numerous traditional craftsmen and women providing them employment and contributing towards their survival. While working with these craftswomen, her interest in indigenous technologies grew, including in water and sustainability, which are at the core of the survival issues of rural folk.  She has since collaborated with her husband, Architect A Mridul, in his ongoing mission to revive traditional technologies to recreate a sustainable environment in the arid regions of Rajasthan. She is especially focussing on the social and cultural perspectives of the traditional water systems of western India. Over the last three years she has been, along with her husband, co-presenting talks on traditional water architecture in various universities in the UK and in Australia. Shilpa is the co-founder of The Jodhpur Lore, an initiative to promote the traditional crafts of her region by way of experiential and training workshop to international artists and art enthusiasts