Report
The geometry of arrangements that contain shapes

Shape grammars compute over shapes which are defined in the universe $U^*$. Shapes in the universe $U^*$ are analogous to line drawings that can be physically realized in the plane. Any shape is embedded or contained in an arrangement of points and lines in the plane called, respectively, registration marks and construction lines, that satisfy special incidence laws. In this paper, arrangements that contain shapes are studied as incidence structures and the finite geometries they give rise to as such are characterized. In particular, arrangements that contain shapes are distinguished into those that give rise to finite near-linear and linear spaces, and those that do not give rise to any proper form of geometry (in the strict mathematical sense). Arrangements that constitute finite geometries (near-linear and linear spaces) give an alternative characterization of determinate rules in shape grammars.

Title
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2020
AuthorsHaridis A
Series TitlearXiv:2010.14250
Pagination1-17
Date Published10/2020
TypeResearch Report
Other NumbersarXiv:2010.14250
Abstract

Shape grammars compute over shapes which are defined in the universe $U^*$. Shapes in the universe $U^*$ are analogous to line drawings that can be physically realized in the plane. Any shape is embedded or contained in an arrangement of points and lines in the plane called, respectively, registration marks and construction lines, that satisfy special incidence laws. In this paper, arrangements that contain shapes are studied as incidence structures and the finite geometries they give rise to as such are characterized. In particular, arrangements that contain shapes are distinguished into those that give rise to finite near-linear and linear spaces, and those that do not give rise to any proper form of geometry (in the strict mathematical sense). Arrangements that constitute finite geometries (near-linear and linear spaces) give an alternative characterization of determinate rules in shape grammars.