4.352 / 4.353
Advanced Video and Related Media

Prerequisites: 
U: 4.351 or permission of instructor; G: permission of instructor
Lab Fee: 
There will be NO lab fee for Fall 2020
Enrollment: 
Limited to 20; UG: 4.352, G: 4.353

This class will examine the aesthetic and technical strategies adopted by iconoclastic cinema and video makers in response to social, political, and ecological upheavals. What strategies (historical and contemporary) have these counter-cultural artists employed in their representation of trauma, conflict, amnesia, and resistance? Might these strategies offer windows into other realities, stories, voices, territories? Might they give rise to minoritarian narrative modes, to other perceptions of time, truth, and power?

Through the production of video exercises, students will put into practice novel technical and conceptual strategies of image and sound manipulation. Screenings, lectures, and readings will provide a theoretical framework for class discussions as well as for peer to peer feedback on works-in-progress. While there will be tailored workshops this is not a purely technical or software-based class. Students will be expected to have a working understanding of video production/post-production fundamentals and will be expected to produce work independently (or collaboratively with the permission of the instructor) outside of class. Students currently engaged in a film/video project are welcome to further develop their projects within the context of this class. Graduate and undergraduate students will be evaluated on a sliding scale. This class will take place online.

 

Additional work required of students taking the graduate version.

This class will examine the aesthetic and technical strategies adopted by iconoclastic cinema and video makers in response to social, political, and ecological upheavals. What strategies (historical and contemporary) have these counter-cultural artists employed in their representation of trauma, conflict, amnesia, and resistance? Might these strategies offer windows into other realities, stories, voices, territories? Might they give rise to minoritarian narrative modes, to other perceptions of time, truth, and power?

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