4.110 / MAS.330, MAS.650
Design Across Scales, Disciplines and Problem Contexts

Note: Graduate Students please register for MAS.S64

Limited enrollment

Inspired by Charles and Ray Eames’ canonical “Powers of Ten”, this course explores the relationship between science and engineering through the lens of Design. It examines how transformations in science and technology have influenced design thinking and vice versa. It offers interdisciplinary tools and methods to represent, model, design and fabricate objects and systems across physical, environmental, economical and social scales. Structured as core lectures and labs, the course is organized by “systems” such as Design of Data, Design of Innovation and Design of Life. Leaders in the fields of Design, Big Data, Synthetic Biology, New Materials and Digital Fabrication will contribute through guest lectures. We will learn design tools - digital and analog; we will develop design methods - disciplinary and anti-disciplinary and we will design things - material and immaterial. Exciting note: this year DASAD will include a special module focusing on DNA design and assembly.

Completion requirements
In addition to the one lecture per week by instructors and guest speakers, one lab session a week will be given. This lab session is mandatory for those who are not familiar with the tools per each session, and are optional for those who are familiar with the tools being taught. The readings are highly recommended, particularly for Graduate Students but not required. Each student is expected to attend all lectures and spend 4-6 hours per week on assignment tutorials and projects.

Evaluation criteria and grading (basis for a grade)*
In addition to the one lecture per week by instructors and guest speakers, one lab session a week will be given. This lab session is mandatory for those who are not familiar with the tools per each session, and are optional for those who are familiar with the tools being taught. The readings are highly recommended, particularly for Graduate Students but not required. Each student is expected to attend all lectures and spend 4-6 hours per week on assignment tutorials and projects.

For Undergraduates, the final grade is distributed as follows: Assignment 1: 25%, Assignment 2: 25%, and Class participation: 50%. For Graduate students, the final grade is distributed as follows: Assignment 1: 25%, Assignment 2: 25%, Assignment 3: 25%, and Class participation: 25%.

TAs:
Arch: Alexandros Charidis, Nicolo Guida, Jessica Jorge, Alexis Sablone,
MAS: Jorge Duro-Royo, Chikara Inamura, Markus Kayser, John Klein, Laia Mogas-Soldevila, William Patrick, Sunanda Sharma
ME: Steven Keating

* Evaluation criteria and grading are to change prior to the start of the spring semester

Readings

http://architecture.mit.edu/pdfs/Syllabi/SPRING14/4.110.pdf

* Reading assignments and/or bibliography are to change prior to the start of the spring semester